The Local Government Institute of Wisconsin, Inc. will collaborate with others to find solutions for the efficient delivery and funding of local government services consistent with the needs of our citizens.

Joint Use Partnerships Between Schools and Local Governments

“Joint use” describes a formal or informal agreement to share a community’s social infrastructure. Joint use typically integrates a public school with other services such as libraries, parks, recreation centers and senior centers. Joint use partnerships are particularly important for underserved neighborhoods or with limited public transportation.
 

Intergovernmental Cooperation Workshop

The Local Government Institute was asked to organize a 3 hour workshop on intergovernmental cooperation. The workshop occurred prior to the 2014 League of Wisconsin Municipalities annual conference on Oct. 15, 2014. The workshop consisted of four panelists and a moderator. The workshop was broken into 5 parts. The presentation for each part can be downloaded by clicking on the link.
 
1.  Introduction - Gary Becker, moderator, Executive Director, Local Government Institute of Wisconsin: Intergovernmental Cooperation for Service Delivery - Lessons Learned
 
2.  Leadership - Henry Veleker, City Administrator, City of Waupaca: Intergovernmental Cooperation is Not Just a Buzzword
 

Broadband in Wisconsin

Broadband coverage is increasingly critical to local government's ability to deliver services efficiently. Broadband infrastructure facilitates remote monitoring of meters, sensors, public safety officer information, administration, billing, and countless other tasks and services.
LGI has collected some resources to help local governments understand the status of broadband deployment in Wisconsin.
 
Broadband: Where is the Coverage by Andy Lewis
Presentation made to the Intercounty Coordinating Committee on April 21, 2014.
 
Economic & Social Impact of Broadband Investment in Wisconsin 

2014 Local Government Collaboration Cited for Recent Economic Successes

A recent article in the Wisconsin State Journal by Tom Still credits local government collaboration along with State incentives, land, location and logistics for landing three big economic development projects - the Amazon distribution center in Kenosha, a United Natural Foods distribution center in Sturtevant (Racine County) and another one in Prescott in Pierce County. 
"Principle of 'creative destruction' means churn and learn for Wisconsin economy"
Read more: http://host.madison.com/business/tom-still-principle-of-creative-destruction-means-churn-and-learn/article_ff990d3c-7d54-5556-bd76-ffcafe75e29d.html#ixzz2wEVOFQPc
 

Lean Government Conference 2013 Presentations Posted

The third annual Lean Government Conference was a great success with over 135 experts, state, county, municipal and town officials convening to learn from one another and discuss specific methods for getting more done with fewer resources.
Many of the presentations from the conference have been posted to the web. Some sessions were highly interactive and were not focused on a formal presentation, so there will not be a presentation listed for those sessions. The presentations may be viewed through the Wisconsin Center for Performance Excellence website at http://www.wisquality.org/lean-government-2013/lean-government-conference-presentations/.

Toward a Sustainable Community: A Toolkit for Local Government

This two-volume publication from the University of Wisconsin - Extension is an excellent resource for local governments wanting to improve their financial, social and environmental sustainability.
 
Volume 1 features:

  • Guidance for Adapting Local Government Functions
  • Energy
  • Buildings
  • Transportation/Mobility
  • Procurement
  • Investments
  • Human Resources
  • Case Studies & Sample Resolutions

Click here to download Volume 1 (2.76 mb)
or visit:
http://www.uwsp.edu/cnr-ap/clue/Documents/Eco-M/SustainabilityToolkitVolume1.pdf
 
Volume 2 features:

2013 Bridging the Gap Between Education Needs of Local Elected Officials and Existing Resources

The Local Government Institute of Wisconsin is pleased to release this white paper on education needs of local elected officials.  This is the third and final white paper in a series of three published by LGI on the subject of education and training for local elected officials.
 
Click here to download
 
This white paper provides recommendations for meeting the education and training needs of local elected officials in Wisconsin given the existing resources available.  Specific recommendations are given on what additional resources should be provided and how currently available resources can be better leveraged and provided to local elected officials.  

2013 More Collaboration Expected for Beloit in 2013

 
Last year was historic in terms of the city meeting with surrounding communities. It held joint meetings with Janesville, the Town of Beloit and Town of Turtle.
 
Officials from the area municipalities looked at ways in which they can collaborate to save money. The most popular idea was joint purchasing.
 
Council members and town officials believe purchasing items, such as building material, could save a significant amount of money.
 
Another popular idea was shared services. The city and the Town of Beloit talked about establishing a “closest station” approach for emergency services.
 
Just as the name suggests, during a fire the closest station would respond whether it was in the city or town.
 

2012 Education Needs of Local Elected Officials

The Local Government Institute of Wisconsin is pleased to release a white paper on education needs of local elected officials. This is the second white paper in a series of three to be published on the subject of education and training for local elected officials.
 
Click here to download
 
This white paper provides a summary of results from a survey distributed to elected county, municipal, and town elected officials.  Results are presented to illustrate the need these elected officials perceived for training in various training categories.  Survey questions were also asked about preferred training format, as well as the barriers to participation in training programs.  The last white paper in this series will provide recommendations for addressing the gaps in training and education resources relative to existing needs.

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